Confederate Flag

Confederate flag–

Symbol of our darkest time,

Human slavery.

Prideful in their ignorance

There are those still full of hate.

 

Don’t they understand,

There are wounds as yet unhealed–

Open and bleeding.

Each raising stings of poured salt

In an already deep gash.

 

I weep for their pain.

Have they not suffered enough

At your racist hands?

The shame is you don’t see it

Being blinded by false pride.

 

~~ Dominic R. DiFrancesco ~~

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20 thoughts on “Confederate Flag

  1. I agree, removing this hated symbol over state capitols, has been too long in coming. However, I would caution, against this trend crossing over into history revisionism. Which, in my mind, would further add to this tragedy.

    • I would agree though I don’t see where removing the flag, which no matter what anyone says was a symbol of a slavery way of life will revise our countries history. I equate it to the swastika in Germany where outlawing and removing it did not and does not change their history. Thank you my friend.

      • I was thinking of local historical sites (forts, museums), which were at one time governed under six different flags. I reside in the Deep South (not a native) and am not making excuses. Some Southern children were taught a different version of Civil War history. Also was keeping in mind, historical tragedies, like internment of Japanese-American families. An exhibit of an internment camp would serve to educate future generations. Agree about the swastika. My German friends talked about how treatment of the Jews during WWII would always be their shame.

      • I agree, we shouldn’t run away from our history, but just that some things should be left to display in museums, such as the Confederate battle flag. I think that African Americans especially would prefer that this flag not be flow at their state capitol as a symbol of state pride. I certainly don’t think that all people in the south are proud of what this flag stood for. It was a tragic time and a very dark time in our nation’s history and one that helped change us as a nation. Unfortunately though we still have a very long way to go. Thank you sir for your very thoughtful comment.

  2. This is a very poignant poem, thank you for sharing, if removing the flag heals remove it. However, I do hope that all southerners are not judged for those that do wrong under the guise of that flag. My ancestors did not have slaves. However, after the War was over; my ancestors were driven off their Native Lands by orders of the President into a desert wilderness. Those ancestors were living on Southern soil, placed into “slavery” by the same government that freed southern slaves. My Great-great-grand parents died on the “Trail of Tears”; yet I do not blame the descendants of those who killed them. I pray for peace and solidarity for this country and to try and hide our history will not solve the problems of those who feel that we are not all created equal. I am sure southerners would not agree with me that we are all descendants of Africa mothers and fathers. Thank you again, Dom…great words. Ann

    • Thank you so much for sharing your perspective on this piece and your family history. I do not at all condemn all southerners for the past nor for the ignorance of others, in fact I would suggest that those who do wrong under the guise of the flag are in the minority. I have friends and family that live in the south, though most are not natives and I don’t believe that one of them fits into this minority that I’m speaking of. As you said though, those that do fit would absolutely disagree that they were descended from African mothers and fathers as would be expected, but denial on their part does not make them right. Again Ann, thank you very much for the great comment. I don’t believe that my family history could compare to the tragedy and injustice inflicted on yours and yet you maintain such a positive perspective which I find absolutely wonderful. Be well my friend.

  3. I think the flag needed to be taken down. Maybe said this on your blog or another’s recently but my Grandma came from Germany and hated the swastika snd Germany old flag. Not sure if it changed but she really wanted my brothers and I to think, even while olsying, Dom. She said the good guys were not necessarily cowboys. We learned acceptance and it is hard when you learn many people don’t.

    • You are right, that flag did need to be taken down. It seems that your Grandma was a very wise woman amongst a seeming minority in WWII Germany. Although I’m sure that there were many more like her that were afraid to speak out out of fear.

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